Adele returns with a 2017 album that reminds women that we don’t need a man to feel proud of who we are

A 20-year-old British singer-songwriter is back with an all-new album, “30,” which debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 200 last week. A pre-album promo video featuring Adele puking was released a few weeks…

Adele returns with a 2017 album that reminds women that we don’t need a man to feel proud of who we are

A 20-year-old British singer-songwriter is back with an all-new album, “30,” which debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 200 last week.

A pre-album promo video featuring Adele puking was released a few weeks back, followed by a Super Bowl hint that a new music video would debut on the NBC network.

The “puke” vid tells the story of Adele sitting on a toilet and taking sips of a beverage, which is what really inspires the singer to go into a frenzy. She goes on a rant in which she breaks down her life and life’s shortfalls as she sings.

She reveals she’s dating a co-worker, makes an admission about not being able to read and has a moment in which she attends a wedding instead of the Grammys.

The surprise introduction of new music is welcome, and her original songs are very honest. The back-to-basics approach shows her giving her fans something to root for. The singer returns to what it sounds like: emotion.

Adele, who was born Adele Drennan, prefers keeping mum about her personal life, but on the track “When We Were Young,” Adele sings, “He told me I’m beautiful, I’m not have many friends,” which is a break from the reclusive singing. It makes sense to use songs like “Someone Like You” and “Hello” as the content for new tunes.

“Pity the poor women/ Loneliness has no limits/ Hang on until it’s over/ My God oh my God,” Adele sings.

I was skeptical about Adele’s new album when I heard the early hits before putting it on, which are a strong indication that this album is a keeper. I can appreciate the message at work, which is exploring how difficult life can be for a woman, and whether men have to suffer through it as well. I also like the music, but I am baffled as to why there are these personal shoutouts to the media and to friends and co-workers.

I am so pleased she’s opening up her life to fans. In “Send My Love,” she sings, “Just because your life is filled with pain/ Doesn’t mean you’re not beautiful.” For a singer so private, I have to admit, it’s refreshing to hear her say she wants people to “embrace their feminine side.”

When you share your life and mind on such a large scale, there is a danger of it coming off as boring and simplistic. However, if Adele has the talent to get audiences to really listen and appreciate her music, she should have no problem connecting.

I hope Adele’s music makes women feel empowered and they get the word out that they don’t have to go through life the same way that other women do. We are not all held to the same standards, and we all should not suffer through life like the women in her songs.

My advice to women, who are still fixated on a big belly and the desire to look thin, is to stop focusing on weight. Look at yourself and make an informed decision for yourself. Don’t let life shape you to the point where you lose your identity.

Women need to look within to find the strength to get by and not let others control their progress. These are women after all. Being a woman does not define us. And I hope that music enables us to always explore our own feelings, no matter how difficult they may be.

“I think there’s a million songs I should have released. There’s no light at the end of the tunnel/ I’m in denial, but I can’t keep denying it,” Adele sings in the album’s signature ballad, “When We Were Young.”

This may be a catchy and emotive song about facing challenges, but there is no time to sit there and indulge in pity. Women have to get over the fact that we need a man in order to succeed in life.

If women continue to fall victim to society’s choice to support only the “perfect” women, we will never see other women not defined by the idea of beauty. Music and art is a long, long list of universal truths, and nobody deserves to be oppressed.

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