Court rules that Nazi tattoo kits not covered by the Nazi-era laws against symbols of genocide

The law does not prohibit a tattoo from being a symbol of a victim, a tattoo that might make the wearer feel the victim’s memory and offer solace to her family is acceptable, according…

Court rules that Nazi tattoo kits not covered by the Nazi-era laws against symbols of genocide

The law does not prohibit a tattoo from being a symbol of a victim, a tattoo that might make the wearer feel the victim’s memory and offer solace to her family is acceptable, according to many Israelis.

The prosecution, represented by prosecutors from the state of Jerusalem, argued that the tattoo kit was part of Nazi genocide and therefore “was part of Nazism’s ideology and ideological culture,” reported the Times of Israel.

The kit, exported to the United States, had been caught on camera in March as part of an investigation of a fake business operating in the Tel Aviv area. The shop was known to have exhibited tattoo kits and customers frequently posted pictures of themselves sporting the visible evidence of their tattoos on social media.

The kit being sold by the company has been credited with being used at Auschwitz, and marks the 20th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi death camp. It is believed that the tattoo kits were part of an unofficial tattoo, meaning the wearer received the device after the fashion of the tattooed German soldiers of World War II, but without official authorization.

The prosecution argued that because of the Holocaust, it was unlawful to allow Nazi symbols on cultural and artistic grounds. It called on the court to do the same to tattoo kits.

“The Auschwitz TATTERED TATTOOS kit was imprinted with Hitler’s name, with the genocidal symbol ‘J’, and with the initials for the Nazi party. It’s an utter absurdity that a kitsch-shop like that on a fashionable street could profit from the issuance of an illegal and misleading TATTOOS souvenir kit. Anyone is encouraged to transfer swastikas and symbols of the Holocaust to themselves. This criminal act cannot be left unpunished.”

The defense argued that the kits had been in Israel for several years, and had been used by Israelis. The kits themselves had been produced in Poland, and the judge felt that “we cannot place a barrier to its entry,” reported the Times of Israel. The judge accepted the defense’s case as being legal, and the case against the kits was now closed.

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