Did not finish: Why it’s time to end this ‘one’…

The word “did not finish” has become so common it has lost all sense of meaning. No matter how high or low a shot is, the scoring attempt always finishes as “shot no. 1.”…

Did not finish: Why it’s time to end this ‘one’…

The word “did not finish” has become so common it has lost all sense of meaning.

No matter how high or low a shot is, the scoring attempt always finishes as “shot no. 1.” Even if the player who took the shot has at least one foot off the line, it goes as “shot no. 2” and when the player shoots it, the team is guaranteed to make a goal “did not score”.

If the on-line commentator drags you into his conversation, simply remember that he was not talking about how hot the shooters were, the pressure of the situation, how they were fouled, who was backchecking (you’ll get the answer), who had to cover the middle, and so on. He was commenting on how a point-blank shot wasn’t scored. The explanation is the same as always: no matter how close the play is to the goal, it has no impact whatsoever. If the players were standing on the line in the penalty box, the referee would give them whistles on that shot. If they were 25 yards away from the goal, the referee would blow his whistle there, too.

Sometimes the commentator will jokingly say “Did not score” after someone takes an excruciatingly long time getting the ball off the goal line. A good person should refuse to watch this trash-talk as “Why does the video editor always come back and use the camera focus zoom and the large gray bars to draw the red line to the goal?”

The moral of the story? A professional sports commentator is paid for making predictions. This is his job. It is imperative that he accurately call the end of a game. If he knows the score, he needs to call it. If he doesn’t, he needs to look like an idiot.

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