Guardian view: Theresa May caught out as bribery allegation engulfs party

Good morning, readers. T chinas’ national curriculum reforms received approval from parliament Thursday, the Australian government has moved to directly regulate payday lenders and in Northern Ireland a mother has been awarded compensation from…

Guardian view: Theresa May caught out as bribery allegation engulfs party

Good morning, readers. T chinas’ national curriculum reforms received approval from parliament Thursday, the Australian government has moved to directly regulate payday lenders and in Northern Ireland a mother has been awarded compensation from her hospital for not giving birth in the correct time slot.

But nothing comes close to news from the governments of Kuwait and the UK today. Following the court of appeal ruling that the UK must pay £110m of reparations to Kuwait in relation to the deaths of Kuwaitis following the Gulf war, the Guardian has learned that the British foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, plans to consider legal action against his own government by the widow of a British-Iraqi computer scientist killed by a roadside bomb in southern Iraq in 2004.

Also this morning, it has been revealed that the key opposition figure in a parliamentary inquiry into marine pollution has admitted he knowingly published research that claimed an oil slick discovered off the Yorkshire coast was being blown up by British navy ships. Iain Erskine-Smith, the MP and co-chair of the cross-party Marine and Coastal Access Group, refused to say why the research had been published or whether he was personally involved in its design.

The US health secretary, Tom Price, has resigned amid an outcry over his use of private charter jets and his advocacy of cutting federal Medicaid funding for low-income Americans. Alex Hern notes that Price’s exit is a blow to Trump.

The ethics debacle is a disappointing development, but it hardly comes as a surprise. Since his appointment, Price has routinely drawn universal condemnation, including among leading Republicans, for his extravagant use of taxpayer money. As Sheila Gould of the Guardian has pointed out, this is far from the first time a Trump appointment has been forced to resign because of ethics concerns. Price should have been disqualified before being picked in the first place.

Do you want more on today’s news? Have a look at our morning briefing on the Guardian today.

‘Cash and plastic’

• “We are already short on cash, and there is nothing that we are doing to address that with a minimum of user or consumer education,” the Reserve Bank of Australia’s governor, Philip Lowe, told parliament on Thursday.

In yet another twist to the self-service parking war, this is a welcome feature of modern life: not having to stand in a line or pay people to do it for you. Instead, you are able to pay by scanning your licence plate, which means you only have to wait for the car to pass.

But in an attempt to tackle long queues in busy public areas, in 2010 the Californian city of San Francisco – which has a population of just 900,000 – put in place the world’s first parking meter that could be physically printed on cardboard. The process still takes half an hour or more, however.

Media roundup

Guardian leader: as Brexit looms, we must always remember that the world belongs to the citizens of the country

The Independent on Sunday: Social media can be a very powerful tool in the fight against gender-based violence, new research has revealed.

The Press Association: Thatcher’s granddaughter considers standing for Tory leadership.

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