Letters: Our child care crisis isn’t being solved

Your story, “Child care bill fizzles out in Ontario,” (TV, 28 June) reported the opposition’s controversial Bill 127 failed to gain enough support to pass. What seems to be missing is that government opposition…

Letters: Our child care crisis isn't being solved

Your story, “Child care bill fizzles out in Ontario,” (TV, 28 June) reported the opposition’s controversial Bill 127 failed to gain enough support to pass. What seems to be missing is that government opposition to Bill 127 was as much due to government party-hopping as any of the motives behind the opposition’s opposition to it. The response of some in government to the bill’s failures shows they do not really understand the seriousness of the child care crisis as it affects the working class and disadvantaged. I sincerely hope the Ontario government and the federal government will see a need to merge, and work in a national effort to address the problem and come up with something short of, what is needed, a radical expansion of daycare capacity.

Make no mistake, the crisis we’re facing is real. A time for careful consideration for me and my family is now.

Amy Sanderson, Toronto

Contrary to your headline and your story, your support of Bill 127 was unequivocally positive in its objective – to stabilize the cost of childcare – and the attendant massive increase in attendance at clinics and child care centres across the province. Expanding child care opportunities is not only an imperative to enable working parents to balance family and work obligations. As an entrepreneur who built an international production and export company, I’ve seen firsthand how many productive and talented employers have been forced to shut down or reduce their presence in Canada because they can’t afford to hire and retain skilled employees. Raising the minimum wage also will benefit the country if it helps to reduce poverty and provide better support to disadvantaged, low-income Canadians.

Kim Fonseca, Ottawa

Yes, some child care centres in eastern Ontario are over-subscribed. But more importantly, they are under-funded to the point where they are requiring unreasonable savings to be made if family members are to be guaranteed access, that in the end will not even be met if these savings are incurred.

Marilyn Atherton, Ottawa

Email: [email protected]

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