Rupert Murdoch speaks to Luis Posada Carriles, the man who assassinated Fidel Castro

WikiLeaks has published the transcript of a June 2017 telephone conversation between Luis Posada Carriles, the Cuban exile said to be the chief of for want of a better phrase, the conspiracy. Carriles, a…

Rupert Murdoch speaks to Luis Posada Carriles, the man who assassinated Fidel Castro

WikiLeaks has published the transcript of a June 2017 telephone conversation between Luis Posada Carriles, the Cuban exile said to be the chief of for want of a better phrase, the conspiracy.

Carriles, a wealthy collector of financial support from Russia, Colombia and Venezuela, would often slip into Venezuela to pay respect to him. His visits were especially convenient for the government as they happened on the ninth day of the month – the unofficial President’s Day and a day where the government introduced vast programs, such as building and cleaning parks, planting flowers in all of Venezuela and a government-run student magazine. He was known as the anti-Castro “Merchant of Death” due to a series of bombings of Cuban commercial and military airplanes.

Frequently I would call to see how President Maduro was being. He was keeping to his words to take care of everything during the recall referendum and those who were leaving the country were being taken care of. So he was traveling to all the provinces to talk to officials. After that, they discussed the economic outlook, especially problems with the business community and particularly with any new agreements they would negotiate with the oil company.

I don’t know what the President’s intention was. I always felt that he was trying to get some of the opposition supporters to get to know him. He was in good spirits, he wasn’t frustrated, and we felt we had to go to Cuba because the situation was so delicate. At that time there was only one road [from Venezuela] south to the Caribbean; that was for weather reasons. By that time there was only one pedestrian bridge. A plane could take off, but not land. Because we were a dying government, we had to look for other sources of money. They said we had to get out of the country because they were going to call a coup d’etat. I said to myself, maybe we should just have the President concentrate on maintaining an oppressive government.

They promised us that in Venezuela they would try to initiate a rebellion against the government, but we were trying to remain calm.

At one point, the President of the Assembly [the leadership of the National Assembly] came to my room and asked me to help him guarantee the loyalty of the members of the [National Assembly] to the government. He said they had to find out who was against the government. I assured him that we had the necessary democracy to resolve the problem.

I don’t remember exactly what happened after that.

-Nicolás Maduro is the President of Venezuela

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