Secret societies of grief and depression

As columnist David Corn observed, it’s difficult to find more sensitive members of the media. And, as you’ll soon see, it’s not just journalists who cry when they’re hurting. A group of people who…

Secret societies of grief and depression

As columnist David Corn observed, it’s difficult to find more sensitive members of the media. And, as you’ll soon see, it’s not just journalists who cry when they’re hurting. A group of people who would never be called on to delve into an intimate or sensitive topic have each other to share the pain.

From “The Good Doctor” to “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Scandal” to “Will & Grace,” TV dramas are now attempting to cope with heavy themes of grief. But even if TV writers and producers have their own mental health experts on staff, those resources should be shared by everyone in the organization: the management, sales and marketing, casting, publicists, costumers, on-air talent and those helping you develop your product. In many cases, tears are the body language of just how emotionally invested many on the show are — at least to the moment that the show was filmed.

It’s hard to be a taboo subject — and TV can help. Given the success of dramas like “Grey’s Anatomy,” you have the “closet group,” the “peer group” of those who sometimes stop and are silent. Yet they are difficult to reach. So I’ve put together a list of these groups and a list of their members — my version of the closet — to help you get in touch with these “secrets societies.” Maybe you’re part of one.

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