Waldorf Bellhop Jimmy Elidrissi Dies at 74

Jimmy Elidrissi, nicknamed “Waldorf Bellhop” due to his bushy mustache and sweet southern accent, has passed away. According to CBS46, Elidrissi died on Friday due to complications with Alzheimer’s Disease. He was 74 years…

Waldorf Bellhop Jimmy Elidrissi Dies at 74

Jimmy Elidrissi, nicknamed “Waldorf Bellhop” due to his bushy mustache and sweet southern accent, has passed away.

According to CBS46, Elidrissi died on Friday due to complications with Alzheimer’s Disease. He was 74 years old.

Here is his full obituary:

A life well lived, sir! Jimmy Elidrissi, 74, had a rich career as a bellhop, bookkeeper, delivery man, nurse, police officer, gas station attendant, and bartender. Born in Houston, Texas, he arrived in Hudson in the late 1960s. Jimmy’s interest in earning a better life was piqued when he read a story about a businessman who traveled the world and dreamed of owning a nightclub, and a night club manager who traveled to meet his boss. Both stories seemed real and exciting to Jimmy, so he started practicing with a bottle of Moet & Chandon Champagne at the Black Pony Diner in Hampton Beach, then, after being offered a job at Club Centro in Nags Head, he became a bellhop and the night club manager’s assistant, and continued to keep a Champagne bottle at the kitchen table, entertaining customers with his impromptu song and dance routines. Jimmy’s love of music was profound, and he would regularly play the saxophone and piano with his friends, and would also perform on the pinball machines, earning a reputation as a jokester and exaggerator. As he gained experience and knowledge working in the clubs and restaurants, his interests grew. Jimmy eventually became an usher, ushering at Studio 54, and even being called the “John Travolta of the act,” although that job eventually went to another man. While working as a bellhop at Rossman’s on Hartshorne, Jimmy became the go-to bellhop, for “the last 10 years. He insisted upon us saying “vuh, vuh, vuh” when we checked in for our shifts, to ensure we did not forget to say ‘good morning” or ‘good evening’ to our guests. Jimmy started his own fix-it business when his children moved back home and he became a chauffeur for his grandchildren. His eight grandchildren helped clean his car, made his meals, and even painted his home. Jimmy eventually moved to Greenville, North Carolina and retired from his job at Donut Town, where he worked until recently. Jimmy was an active member of the Southsea American Legion Post #134, who loved the after-lunch karaoke, and was a life-long member of South Daytona American Legion Post #132, a camp counselor for our neighborhood youth, and a former president of the local car club, and a chaplain for Four Street United Methodist Church in Hampton Beach. Jimmy was preceded in death by his wife of 31 years, Ginny; his father and stepmother, Gerald and Alice; and a brother, James. Jimmy is survived by his son, Ronald of Fairhope, Alabama; two daughters, Aimee (John) Cohn of Fort Pierce, Florida, and Barbara (Karl) Menard of Orlando, Florida; six grandchildren, John, Michelle, Daniel, Rebecca, Jessica, and Hailey; and six great-grandchildren, Lillian, Hunter, Patrick, Rhealynn, Gabriel, and Rainey.

Late last week, John Thorne recounted a personal story about Elidrissi and said, “In 2011, my father, who was a fellow World War II vet, flew into the City of Hudson, then a part of Cape Hatteras, on a medevac flight. We got the tour of the military hospital from his pilot and medical director, two fellows he had known for years. One of them, John Goss, who had fought at Normandy and helped repel the whole Nazi army as a 16-year-old in the 10th Armored, wound up becoming a second lieutenant in the 10th at the end of the war. The other was Jimmy Elidrissi, who survived four assassination attempts during that war, two of which hit him as he was off his horse. The other gentleman told my dad that, at about that time, he was having a cup of coffee at a tavern and was instantly addressed as “wool-patchy.” John told my dad: “I have only the affection to tell you I miss Jimmy.”

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