What It Meant When Beavers Picked a Side

News story (Canadian): Northern Ontario’s not-so-swashbuckling beavers have found themselves in a pond predicament. Metrolinx, a provincial transportation authority, has reportedly fenced off the fenced-off pond’s sides to discourage usage. But the beavers, who…

What It Meant When Beavers Picked a Side

News story (Canadian):

Northern Ontario’s not-so-swashbuckling beavers have found themselves in a pond predicament. Metrolinx, a provincial transportation authority, has reportedly fenced off the fenced-off pond’s sides to discourage usage. But the beavers, who have become well-known and beloved by Canadian residents, find themselves in a catch-22 situation. Do they stay, and develop as naturalists suggest? Or do they go back to the pond, and die?

Storytelling:

Metrolinx is in trouble with beavers.

The beavers are trying to get in, too.

Having taken matters into their own – well, not so much by exploring the aquifer’s bottom, but the side of the property – the beavers are now battling Metrolinx and members of the community who want the beavers to leave.

Locals are drawing the battle over the pond into a social-media battle.

If you listen closely, you can hear the sounds of people’s brains dividing down the middle.

When Crain’s asked Metrolinx spokesman Patrick Brown what strategy they were taking to tackle the beavers’ activities, the agency’s website said simply, “We don’t know.” The agency has instead turned to tactics that include using boats to drive over the pond’s frozen edges to back out to the other side, long-term shrinking the area to an even smaller one, and draining the pond so that it does not have any water below the beaver’s ice.

Storytelling:

How can this problem be solved? Beavers have a way with words!

In their first-person narrative, “The Beavers!” the beavers gave their readers a tip-off on how best to tackle Metrolinx’s woes with beavers.

The beavers brought up the idea of accepting the beavers’ second act, saying that perhaps they should work to restore the barrier of frozen ponds on the beaver’s side of the pond. They offered other suggestions, like building a cliff around the pond and deploying the “perilous tools of a diplomat,” adding that their situation couldn’t “be any worse,” but merely that this had to be “serious.”

Storytelling:

Metrolinx’s spokesman, Patrick Brown, said the beavers pose no threat to humans or property.

Metrolinx acted on the advice of an employee who said that the beavers don’t “harm people” or property, according to Crain’s.

But our beavers have others ideas.

Storytelling:

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