Why police are looking for a dead man’s car

In these days of enhanced data protection, the service failed to pick up the signal on Donovan’s signal until four hours after he lost his car. Below, tell your local municipality, police chief, and…

Why police are looking for a dead man’s car

In these days of enhanced data protection, the service failed to pick up the signal on Donovan’s signal until four hours after he lost his car.

Below, tell your local municipality, police chief, and motor vehicle departments to look for Drew Donovan, reportsthe Toronto Star.

Days after Kevin Donovan received a call from his insurance company, which had traced his stolen Audi Q7 to Halifax, he saw the car, speeding towards the North Carolina-US border.

Police do not have an arrest record for Donovan, who filed for bankruptcy in 2008 after ducking child support payments totalling $25,000 (about £17,000), but they do not think that he fled the country.

Donovan’s primary records show he left Canada in September, when his Audi Q7 was stolen from his driveway on Klein Drive in Toronto.

Authorities have reason to believe that the Audi was later picked up in London, England, leaving the UK for the Middle East in mid-October. The car wasn’t heading anywhere any further than an autonomous oil tanker, known as an ‘Omega Rock,’ in Port Henderson, North Carolina.

Authorities monitored Donovan’s whereabouts for most of that month, but were stopped by a lapse in communication when the car showed up in Halifax. An erroneous report came in that the car belonged to a missing Minnesotan. That didn’t correspond with Donovan’s reported whereabouts.

Police were first alerted to the car on November 10. By 5 pm the next day, they’d located Donovan with fellow hiker Alexander Antich in the North Carolina woods.

Antich was reporting a possible hunting excursion gone wrong. Donovan was carrying five bags, but in his haste he never brought along any food or water, leading to his solitary, diabetic, prolonged and ultimately fatal trip.

That night, Donovan’s recovery drew unusually large crowds at what has become a popular recovery site north of Atlanta. Some wondered why Donovan was only an hour from receiving help, when he’d committed no crime, but others sympathized.

“I’m a bit sympathetic to Kevin because I know a lot of things can happen if you have limited access,” says Kristy Bainbridge, who’d rescued another lost driver that day.

“It’s very frustrating not to know where you’re at, and here is a case where we know where it happened and we didn’t have to waste time searching for it.”

Donovan, 50, told police he’d left his home in the evening on October 31 to head to the same part of the Georgia forest. He’d found his missing keys, so he could use his unlocked car to get to his hunting party.

When he returned, he’d forgotten to take off his winter boots, and so he made his way down the state road with his boots untied, using them to break into some garbage cans.

Sometime that night, he put both back on. His truck was gone, but he did not discover its location until four days later, on December 6. With a map and car keys, officers tracked Donovan and Antich’s location, and finally found them more than 160 miles away.

At a courthouse appearance Wednesday, Donovan’s lawyer argued for his release, claiming that his client had spent time living on the road for work in the past.

But defence lawyer Andrew O’Brien did not say whether Donovan planned to move. And they have few options, as the situation might be difficult to prove to a court.

Theo Newby, a Halifax robbery detective, had no idea where the car was. “There’s a little bit of jurisdictional red tape that’s in play,” he said. “I don’t want to start scouring through this neighbourhood looking for Colin.”

The OPP, who have jurisdiction over Port Henderson, told 9 News they are not investigating the missing car case. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are investigating, as is the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. They could not be reached for comment by press time.

Canadian authorities say that Donovan would have to provide evidence of his travel to a Federal Bureau of Investigation employee in the US, or mail off some form of travel document.

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